ferocious. fierce. fabulous.

Hedi Xandt - Punk’s Not Head (female model)
glass, porcelain, metal, leather
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Hedi Xandt - Punk’s Not Head (female model)

  • glass, porcelain, metal, leather

(Source: dieselreboot, via nudebeat)

The Platonic Solids These five Platonic solids are ideal, primal models of crystal patterns that occur throughout the world of minerals in countless variations. These are the only five regular polyhedra, that is, the only five solids made from the same equilateral, equiangular polygons. They are geometrical forms which are said to act as a template from which all life springs. The aesthetic beauty and symmetry of the Platonic solids have made them a favorite subject of geometers for thousands of years. They are named after the ancient Greek philosopher Plato who theorized that the classical elements were constructed from the regular solids. To the Greeks, these solids symbolized fire, earth, air, spirit (or ether) and water. The Platonic solids are also called “cosmic figures” and are the basic modules for Sacred Geometry. 

The Platonic Solids These five Platonic solids are ideal, primal models of crystal patterns that occur throughout the world of minerals in countless variations. These are the only five regular polyhedra, that is, the only five solids made from the same equilateral, equiangular polygons. They are geometrical forms which are said to act as a template from which all life springs. The aesthetic beauty and symmetry of the Platonic solids have made them a favorite subject of geometers for thousands of years. They are named after the ancient Greek philosopher Plato who theorized that the classical elements were constructed from the regular solids. To the Greeks, these solids symbolized fire, earth, air, spirit (or ether) and water. The Platonic solids are also called “cosmic figures” and are the basic modules for Sacred Geometry. 

(via selfrighteoussocialclub-deactiv)

Gradient:  mustard yellow to pure magenta View high resolution

Gradient:  mustard yellow to pure magenta

(Source: 997, via cigarettesandmartinis)

Nature by Design

Nature by Design

(Source: neuse, via nobleruin)

What do we sing about, when we sing about the body? 

Fleshmap (artists Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg) created the chart above showing how many times different body parts are mentioned in various genres of popular music. Based on a compilation of more than 10,000 songs, the piece visualizes the use of words representing body parts in popular culture. Each musical genre exhibits its own characteristic set of words, with more frequently used terms showing up as bigger images with the size of a circle corresponding to how often that part is mentioned in each genre.  The charts for each genre go into more detail, showing the usage of different synonyms for each body part.
View high resolution

What do we sing about, when we sing about the body?

Fleshmap (artists Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg) created the chart above showing how many times different body parts are mentioned in various genres of popular music. Based on a compilation of more than 10,000 songs, the piece visualizes the use of words representing body parts in popular culture. Each musical genre exhibits its own characteristic set of words, with more frequently used terms showing up as bigger images with the size of a circle corresponding to how often that part is mentioned in each genre.  The charts for each genre go into more detail, showing the usage of different synonyms for each body part.

Alternative Music
eye (12.42%)
hand (10.22%)
head (7.72%)
face (6.49%)
arms (3.53%)
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Alternative Music

  • eye (12.42%)
  • hand (10.22%)
  • head (7.72%)
  • face (6.49%)
  • arms (3.53%)
Country Music
eye (12.65%)
hand (11.95%)
arms (6.75%)
face (6.13%)
head (4.58%)
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Country Music

  • eye (12.65%)
  • hand (11.95%)
  • arms (6.75%)
  • face (6.13%)
  • head (4.58%)