Golden Youth by Jim Ferringer/ Ewoud Broeksma
Featured in www.VitruvianLens.com

Golden Youth by Jim Ferringer/ Ewoud Broeksma

Featured in www.VitruvianLens.com

(Source: toinelikesart, via 100artistsbook)

Anila Quayyum Agha - Intersections
Artist’s statement: 
“In excavating these motifs from the everyday and the humdrum, I also intend to elevate and anoint them as expressions of the ordinary that when attended to and explored, reveal the complexities of symbiosis between cultures and civilizations and the amorphous borders between them,” wrote Agha in her statement for the piece. “In a contextual milieu where difference and divergence dominate most conversations about the intersection of civilization, this piece explores the presence of harmonies that do not ignore the shadows, ambiguities and dark spaces between them but rather explore them in novel and unexpected ways.”
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Anila Quayyum Agha - Intersections

Artist’s statement: 

  • “In excavating these motifs from the everyday and the humdrum, I also intend to elevate and anoint them as expressions of the ordinary that when attended to and explored, reveal the complexities of symbiosis between cultures and civilizations and the amorphous borders between them,” wrote Agha in her statement for the piece. “In a contextual milieu where difference and divergence dominate most conversations about the intersection of civilization, this piece explores the presence of harmonies that do not ignore the shadows, ambiguities and dark spaces between them but rather explore them in novel and unexpected ways.”

(via kramenstarb)

Anila Quayyum Agha - Intersections 
The inspiration for the piece came on a recent trip to the mosques in Alhambra, Spain. While women were excluded from the mosques and required to pray at home during her upbringing in Pakistan, in Spain, Agha was able to appreciate the beauty of the geometric motifs that decorate the holy temples, as well as think about the mosques as a place of cross-cultural dialogue in Moorish Spain. While the patterning of the piece might be familiar to viewers from Islamic cultures, Agha explained that she took them out of their context to spark a conversation about the ambiguities and contradictions within a multi-cultural exchange.
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Anila Quayyum Agha - Intersections 

  • The inspiration for the piece came on a recent trip to the mosques in Alhambra, Spain. While women were excluded from the mosques and required to pray at home during her upbringing in Pakistan, in Spain, Agha was able to appreciate the beauty of the geometric motifs that decorate the holy temples, as well as think about the mosques as a place of cross-cultural dialogue in Moorish Spain. While the patterning of the piece might be familiar to viewers from Islamic cultures, Agha explained that she took them out of their context to spark a conversation about the ambiguities and contradictions within a multi-cultural exchange.

(via kramenstarb)

Beatriz Milhazes
Between the Ocean and the Mountains Multi-colored screenprint 1997-1998

Beatriz Milhazes

Between the Ocean and the Mountains
Multi-colored screenprint
1997-1998

(via fyeahwomenartists)

Beatriz Milhazes
The Silver and the Gold Multi-colored screenprint 1997-1998

Beatriz Milhazes

The Silver and the Gold
Multi-colored screenprint
1997-1998

(via fyeahwomenartists)

Beatriz MilhazesSerpentine Multi-colored screenprint 2003

Beatriz Milhazes
Serpentine
Multi-colored screenprint
2003

(via fyeahwomenartists)

Le carnaval des couleurs
Brazilian artist Beatriz Milhazes’ is well known for her vibrantly colorful, kaleidoscopic collages, prints, paintings and installations which draw on both Latin American and European traditions. Milhazes’ rigorously structured compositions are punctuated by a recurring set of arabesque motifs inspired by Brazilian culture, ceramics, lacework, carnival decoration, music, and Colonial baroque architecture.
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Le carnaval des couleurs

  • Brazilian artist Beatriz Milhazes’ is well known for her vibrantly colorful, kaleidoscopic collages, prints, paintings and installations which draw on both Latin American and European traditions. Milhazes’ rigorously structured compositions are punctuated by a recurring set of arabesque motifs inspired by Brazilian culture, ceramics, lacework, carnival decoration, music, and Colonial baroque architecture.

(via boumbang)